[Review] Holman Study Bible NKJV

Title: Holman Study Bible NKJV
Publisher: B and H Publishing September 2013
Genre: Bible
Format: Hardcover
Pages: 2304
Rating: 5 Stars for Excellent
Source: Free copy from B and H Publishing for the purpose of review.

$34.99 at Christian Book Distributor. 

$35.83 at Amazon. 

Link @ publisher: Holman Study Bible NKJV. 

Summary:
9 point text.
Double column.
141 photos, in color.
15,000 study notes.
59 maps, in color. Some of the maps appear to look dimensional.
40 pages of concordance.
The words of Christ in red.
Attached purple satin ribbon marker.
Bible reading plans.
Notes on: "God's Plan for Salvation", "Preface to the New King James Version", "How to Read and Study the Bible", the history of the bible-the Old Testament and New Testament.
Before each Bible book a section explaining: the "author", "Background", its "Message and Purpose", "Contribution to the Bible", and "Structure".
A timeline of events is given at the beginning of each Bible book.
"Preface to the New King James Version" explains the text used for the OT and NT.
"The Greek text used for the New Testament is the one that was followed by the King James translators: the traditional text of the Greek-speaking churches, called the Received Text or Textus Receptus, first published in 1516." Page xvi.


For a definition of the Textus Receptus, see Wikipedia link. 

My Thoughts:

1. The text is easy to read.
The text is nine point, but what set it apart for me is it's in bold print. I've noticed it is not easy to identify in a Bible the type font style, nor the text size. I have to research a bit online to find this information. I wear bifocals and up-close reading is my weakest vision problem. Bold print helps.
2. The introduction chapter set the tone for me in this bible. The men and women who edited this edition love God's word, and believe it is the Holy inspired Word of God. In an age, where so many have walked away from believing and trusting in the Bible as God's breathed word, I'm more than pleased with the team of contributors in stating several times through the introduction chapters, the Bible is God's Word for mankind.
"The Christian religion rests fundamentally on the belief that God has chosen to reveal Himself to a human race that is estranged from Him. God has done this not only through miraculous signs, sweeping acts of providence, and the life and words of Jesus Christ, but through 66 writings collectively known as the Bible." Page ix
3. "How to read and Study the Bible", is included as an introduction chapter. The seven page summary explains: why we should read the Bible, how to read it, pray before reading, how to study the Bible deeper, encouragement to read the Bible daily, questions to ask while reading, and the theme of Scripture.
4. There are two chapters on the history of the OT and NT. Several questions are addressed which people can sometimes stumble on, for example: "Do We Have the Right Books?" The history of the NT, which is placed in the Bible before beginning the NT books, addresses a few apologetic points, for example the NT books became sacred only because Christians had forgotten how they had "originated".
5. "Footnotes" are given on each page in the NT to reveal the "variants" from the Greek NT. "NU-Text" or "M-Text" will be shown with the defining difference.
6. Nineteen charts are given, for example a chart of David's family (wives, children, grandchildren) and located just before the book of 1 Samuel. Another chart located in the book of Luke which defines, "The Apostles and Their History".
7. The pages are a matte finish and easy to turn.

Over-all, I found the Holman Study Bible NKJV: visually appealing, easy to use, the order of additional information is well-presented, edifying, and encourages further reading and study of the Bible.
The Holman Study Bible NKJV is a remarkable Bible.

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