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(Review) Uninvited: Living Loved When You Feel Less Than, Left Out, and Lonely by Lysa TerKeurst

Publisher and Publication Date: Thomas Nelson. 2016.
Genre: Christian Nonfiction, rejection.
Pages: 288.
Source: Self-purchase.
Rating: Very Good.

Lysa at Twitter: @LysaTerKeurst.
Lysa's website: Lysa Terkeurst.
Lysa at Facebook: Lysa Terkeurst. 

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Uninvited is a book about rejection.
For me, growing up I wanted to be loved and accepted by my dad and boyfriends. But time and time again their behavior towards me was rejection. And rejection feels unloving. Later, with maturity, I came to understand their rejection was because they were broken people.
TerKeurst gave an illustration in her book about feeling as if we don't measure up against other women or when a friendship goes sour. For example, when we compare ourselves to toned women at the gym. I'm glad she gave deeper examples, like when a father acts rejecting towards his children.
Chapter one begins with TerKeurst admitting, honesty wants to come out of hiding, rather than the "carefully edited edition of me."
One maliciously crafted rejection with my exact vulnerabilities in mind will pierce the deepest part of me. Being mature in my faith can help me better process it. It can help me have a better reaction to it. It can even help me remove the arrow and patch up the wound. But spiritual maturity doesn't shield me from rejection. Page 3.
A present circumstance of rejection reminds us of past circumstances of rejection. Then the whole gets dug deeper with sadness.
Rejection isn't just an emotion we feel. It's a message that's sent to the core of who we are, causing us to believe lies about ourselves, others, and God. We connect an event from today to something harsh someone once said. That person's line becomes a label. The label becomes a lie. And the lie becomes a liability in how we think about ourselves and interact in every future relationship. Page 8.
Sixteen chapters include titles such as: "Three Questions We Must Consider,"
"Hello, My Name Is Trust Issues," "Why Does Rejection Hurt So Much?," "The Enemy's Plan Against You," and "What I Thought Would Fix Me Didn't."

Word studies are included in the book. For example, the word steadfast. Steadfast in Hebrew is "samak, which means 'to brace uphold, support."
The book is not a theological study, but it does use Scripture to illustrate points. The book includes Scripture portions from Isaiah, the Psalms, Zephaniah, Ephesians, and the Gospel of John. The chapter on "The Corrective Experience," holds the story of Nabal, Abigail, and David.

What stood out to me in chapter four:
I can't expect any other person to be my soul oxygen. I can't live as if my next breath depends on whether or not they give me enough air for my lungs or to be screaming in pain. Because here's the thing. People don't mind doing CPR on a crisis victim, but no person is equipped to be the constant lifeline to another. Page 45.
TerKeurst goes on to further state we can not have unrealistic expectations of other people because these high expectations "they can't ever possibly meet." Page 45.
God is our "soul oxygen." We have His "fullness" abiding in us. We can turn to Him. We can depend on Him.

Chapter 14 holds several prayers to help during a time of suffering.
A chapter holds final words on promises from the Lord.
A chapter includes a test we give ourselves, and a friend gives us on improving any places in our lives that need help.
Ending chapters are the Scriptures in entirety that were given in the book, and the last chapter, "Things I Don't Want You To Forget."

Please be in prayer for Lysa TerKeurst. Her life and family is in deep need of prayer and support.
Rejection, Heartache, and a Faithful God. 





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